Author Archives: weezyworks

WW #49

Posted on by .

I’ve been hard at work making Christmas cards this week. These are made using string art methods. The patterns were found in various places on the internet for free, most from Pinterest links. I plan to make a video today to show how they are made.

The pictures below show a few of the first. I made 50 in total and it got easier as I went along.

 

This is the blooming nine patch before I loaded it onto the longarm frame.

This is just one of 274 blocks I made for a double 4 patch quilt.

Happy Thanksgiving!

WW #48

Posted on by .

I had a very busy July! After time with the grandkids, I went to Kelly’s guild sew in day and meeting.

Stay tuned for a new ornament runner. I won second place for the Christmas in July event!

Check out Kelly’s awesome work.

Check out Love Notions Patterns, the wonderful Laundry Day Tee is free when you join the Facebook group.

I used this pattern for my me made undies.

I made a new blouse for my family reunion. I used stretch chiffon found at Joanns and McCall’s pattern M6605.

I need to adjust the armholes and add the ties to the back but otherwise I love it.

*note: we have lovely rest stops in Ohio, but they lack in proper photography lighting ūüėÄ

Hubs took a moment away from picture snapping to pose with me.

My brother, sister, mom and I.

My kids……

and the grandkids.

This lovely young lady is the proud new owner of my most recent Bonnie Hunter mystery quilt.

I didn’t talk a lot about the reunion but we had an awesome day with my loved ones.

I’ve adopted a Paleo diet to cure what ails me. So far, it’s working!

WW #46

Posted on by .

It’s Memorial Day weekend and my thoughts are with those who sacrificed for my freedom. Thank you seems so little in return, but I am grateful.

Here’s what I’ve been sewing; hundreds of hexy flowers! ¬†These piles have taken years to form. I do them when I’m in the mood to hand sew and I have so many hexes cut already. I think they multiply when I close the box they live in!

I started a top with a light green path but feared it will take much longer than I want to make it king sized.  Why not forgo the path and just stitch them together?!

Hubs turned 60 yesterday. This was taken last week at the antiques joint. He was amused by this art/grill. If he hadn’t already purchased a new grill recently…

This pattern is called Sango Contemporary 6504. If only I needed a new set of dishes. Instead, I’ll use this as inspiration for future quilting patterns.

This came home with me. These toy irons came with trivets, though mine doesn’t.

Here the little baby meets its new momma. She has been a trusty door stop since we found her.  These irons are small but heavy.

I finished this case makeover last week but talked about it in today’s episode.

Feel free to download the cheat sheet I created for the lid of my case. It’s created from my original manual and the most used information for my needs.

May you all be blessed and happy this holiday!

Singer 301 Case Redo Part 2

Posted on by .

Finally, I finished the first 301 case makeover. I ended up using the same wallpaper inside that I used on the outer portion.  Even though the wallpaper was pre-pasted, I used white glue to adhere it to the inside of the case.

Before applying glue, make sure to dry fit your pieces. I used a lot of left overs from the outside, so mine isn’t perfect and I’m ok with that. It looks better than it did and I had very little waste.

I started with the largest area and once the paper was the correct size, I glued it in place. I think it’s best to wait a few days for this step to completely dry but if you’re not using pre-pasted paper, it may not slide as much as mine did.

Then I cut strips just slightly less in the width of the edge. ¬†Once again, dry fit the paper to make sure it’s not going to hang over the rim and that it covers the areas you want covered.

The main compartment can be tricky. These trapezoid cases are an odd shape and can be hard to measure! I chose the easy route and cut everything in pieces rather than math and keep everything in one piece. It was probably easier to glue down this way as well.

I started with the bottom piece, making all my pieces just a tad shorter so they didn’t overhang the edge.

The sides were probably the hardest pieces to cut. I cut a long strip using the measurement of the bottom. Then placed the long straight edge against the back of the case and traced a line, on the back side of the paper, with a pencil along the outside of the case. Once I cut this angle on my paper, I dry fit the piece inside the case, lightly scoring where I wanted the top and bottom cuts to be.

Finally, I repeated the steps from the bottom portion along the top, covering the handle screws.

Once all my edges were glued down and secure, I left the case open to dry completely for a few days.

Now it’s time to put on the finishing touches!

On this case, I wanted to put a clear flap in the lid to cover the most frequently used instructions (and store whatever booklet may have been with the machine). I will be printing out a threading diagram in the future to place here.

I cut a piece of vinyl approximately 11 by 15 inches and bound the edge with a 1.5 inch strip. I didn’t need the binding so you can skip it if you like, but I like the contrast.

I then added another strip as shown to cover the binding edges.

I folded over the raw edge and stitched it down to make gluing it in place easier.  The fabric flap will act as a hinge. I used a glue gun, but you can use your favorite strong glue to attach the fabric to the lid, gluing it down to the same side as the hinges.

For this project, I used a pretty heavy duty velcro. It has a very strong adhesive on the back and holds together quite well. I cut 2 pieces about an inch wide and attached them one to each top corner of my plastic flap. The easiest method to place the opposite sides in the case is to leave the hook and loop together and remove the paper, one side at a time, and press into place.

The lid is now done so we move on to the inner case storage. I glued the painted blue wooden pieces back in place (you can see them in a few of the pictures below).

Below is a picture of another case I have. It shows the wooden block in the middle (which prevents excessive sliding of the machine) and a metal divider for accessories. I think these were the only 2 configurations for the inside. I will be redoing this case in the future!

I cut a piece of vinyl 28 by 4 1/2 inches and bound one long edge with a 1.5 inch strip. Of course the strip is optional but makes it easier to see once in place and will keep your vinyl from distorting over time.

I have an original attachments box and based this measurement on my box. I also made allowance for ease of inserting and removing the box.

Mark at 9 inches and fold the vinyl over to that mark. I used a 1/4 inch seam allowance and bigger stitches than I normally would.

I brought the other edge over to the seam I just made and stitched a 1/4 inch again.

I inserted the box in the smaller pouch created and dry fit the piece in my case to find the spot where I wanted it attached.

Using the same industrial velcro, I cut 2 more inch wide pieces and attached one to the bottom and one to the top where I marked.

Put the hook and loop together, leaving the paper on the top. Carefully place the bottom in firmly pressing against the side. (notice the blue wooden pieces)

Remove the paper from the top and carefully press in place. This top area is where I’ll store my foot control.

Tada!

The inside is now finished and ready to use. ¬†Because I used glue completely across the paper pieces I glued down, the “featherweight case odor” is gone.

I hope you find this information helpful and I’d love to see your case makeovers!